Transforming the economy

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On the global stage, New Zealand’s economy has obvious vulnerabilities: its reliance on export, uncertainties affecting major markets and political instability across many regions, complicated by a lack of coherent global action on climate change.

This Budget has focused on climate change, land use and national infrastructure. With a capital boost of over $3b, the aim is to create opportunities for businesses, regions, iwi and others to transition to a sustainable low-emissions economy.

The $229m Sustainable Land Use Package will fund projects to protect waterways and wetlands and support farmers and growers in using their land more sustainably. It provides funding for advice to farmers; support for Māori agribusiness and farmers changing over to more environmentally sustainable and higher value production; improving on-farm emissions data and upgrading decision and regulatory tools; protecting high value food exports; and updating the country’s official assurances system. An additional $49m is allocated to help transform the forestry sector and support the One Billion Trees programme.

$1b over the next two years is allocated to modernising KiwiRail. Reduced carbon emissions and increased regional business opportunities are key drivers. If taking heavy traffic off our roads reduces our road toll, the payback will be in human capital.

Teaching your kids about money

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Mom and daughter are shopping at the supermarket, the concept of family relationships and healthy eating

The money we spend each day tends to be invisible. When was the last time you withdrew your cash for the week and used it to make purchases? Rather than dealing in notes and coins, we tend to reach for our cards or shop seamlessly online. It’s entirely possible to spend money without even reaching for your wallet.

This can give kids some confusing messages about how money is spent. The danger here is that they won’t develop financial literacy and will struggle to manage their own money later on. One way to help them to build their financial management skills is to choose moments to talk to them about money and why you’re making certain decisions.

These moments could include:

Shopping at the supermarket – If you’re taking your kids on the weekly shop, get them involved in the process. Involve them in drawing up your shopping list and talk through your budget. Have them help you to find items, and weigh up differently-priced options. As a bonus, helping them to understand how a food budget works might just cut down on all those requests for treats!

Withdrawing money from the ATM – Getting out money does seem a little magical. So it’s important that kids can make the connection between the money you go to work for, and what they see coming out of the wall. Talk to them about where the money you’re withdrawing will go and help to understand the importance of knowing what’s in your bank account.

Letting them make choices – When it comes to pocket money or money from a birthday or Christmas, it can be helpful to let your children experience the consequences of their financial decisions. It’s tempting to tell them what to do with their money, but once they discover that they can only spend their precious cash once, take the time to talk with them about what they are feeling and how they might use their money differently in the future.

Choosing activities – When you choose what to do as a family, don’t forget to talk through the costs of different options. Kids will appreciate balancing an expensive trip to the movies with a free picnic in the park or will be amazed when they compare the cost of an icecream at a parlor versus a whole tub at the supermarket. Encourage them to brainstorm and research low-cost ideas and get creative!